15691
/en/utdanning/statistikker/utfolk/aar
15691
Participants from 50 different nations
statistikk
2002-06-26T10:00:00.000Z
Education
en
utfolk, Folk high schools (discontinued), participants, cohorts, main subjects (for example languages, services, social studies), foreign nationalsAdult education, Education
false

Folk high schools (discontinued)2001

SSB publishes figures for long courses in Folke high Schools in the statistics Upper secondary education

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Participants from 50 different nations

In 2001, 19 000 participants attended short courses at Norwegian folk high schools, an increase of 15 per cent from the previous year. There were participants from 50 different nations and 405 Norwegian municipalities.

Except for the host country, there were most participants from Germany, Denmark and Sweden. Close to 75 per cent were women, and half of all participants were in the age group 50 years and above.

Equal number from Nordic and Continental Europe

More than 1200 non-resident foreign citizens attended a short course at Norwegian folk high schools during 2001, accounting for six per cent of all short course participants. 95 per cent of foreign citizens originated from other European countries, half of them from Nordic countries, the other half from Continental Europe. There were most foreign citizens from Germany (290), Denmark and Sweden (240 each) and Russia (220). Of all foreign participants, the majority, 62 per cent, was female. Women were also in majority, 67 per cent, in the age group 50 years and above. Women and men in the age group 50 years and above accounted for 45 per cent of all foreign participants.

Women above 50 in majority

In total there were 12 000 female and 7 000 male participants at short courses during 2001. The age group 50 years and above was the largest age group with more than 10 000 participants or 53 per cent of all participants. Women aged 50 and above was the largest group accounting for 33 per cent of all participants at short courses during 2001. The age group 17 - 19 years was the smallest group with only 8 per cent of all participants.

2001 data shows that aesthetic and crafts subjects were the most popular courses. Whereas 33 per cent preferred aesthetic and crafts, 24 per cent chose social studies. Least popular were transport and communications courses, science, industrial and technical subjects. 80 per cent of all participants at transport and communications courses were male. At natural resource management, ecology, environmental protection and outdoor recreation courses, male and female participants were equally balanced. At all other main courses women were in majority. Age only modestly influenced participants' choice of subject. Across all age groups, aesthetic and crafts subjects were the most popular courses. Between Norwegian and foreign citizens there was a significant difference in choice of course. Most Norwegian participants, 36 per cent, preferred aesthetic and crafts courses, whereas most foreign participants, 42 per cent, chose social science courses.

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